Grant application · Group work · Haptics

Recently submitted a project proposal to this year’s Forte junior research grant!

Tordmule

A few weeks ago I wrote a blog post about the spring of opportunities, which basically contained lists of possible research grant and job opportunities that were open or should open during the spring term. Just before lunch today, I submitted the first of my planned project proposals! This one went to Forte and their grants for junior researchers.

The proposed project relates to work that I performed while I was still working at KTH as a Ph.D. student and the content was also inspired by the application that I sent to VR last year (see this blog post). The project is based on the fact that today’s assistive technologies that visually impaired pupils use in the classroom are not really designed for collaborative situations – the technology could sometimes be a hindrance when doing group work with sighted peers. Our hope is that the planned activities will really shed light on the problems this is causing and show how one can make use of modern technology, based on haptic and audio feedback, to find ways ahead. I have already done a few studies in this area which you e.g. can read about in this article (note that this is a pre-print version). I will write more about this when I get an answer from Forte about the draft later on in April.

My co-applicant is Eva-Lotta Sallnäs Pysander from KTH, who was also my main supervisor there. If we get the grant, we will hopefully be able to add a Ph.D. student to the research team as well.

I must say that it’s nice to have this proposal submitted. I really believe in the ideas in it and I also think that the project could make a real difference. Since I’m generally very interested in multimodal interaction and learning, this is also one of the areas I really want to focus on in my research in the future. The other area is eHealth and as I have written before there are quite a few funding opportunities in that area as well during this spring. But right now I’m just enjoying that I have one application out there, just as the razorbill in the image above probably enjoys sitting on a cliff looking out over the ocean…

 

conference · Uppsala Health Summit

Organizing a workshop at Uppsala Health Summit!

In a few earlier blog posts I have mentioned that I’m one of the co-organizers of a workshop at Uppsala Health Summit. This summit is an annual large international meeting, where challenges in health and healthcare are brought up to discussion. The summit is highly multi-disciplinary in nature and usually involves researchers, patients, policy makers and business representatives to name a few categories. The main coordinator of the whole thing is Madeleine Neil.

Every year Uppsala Health Summit has different themes. Last year the theme was “Tackling Infectious Disease Threats – Prevent, detect, respond with a One Health approach”. You can read about last year’s version of the summit here. This year the theme, which is described here, is “Care for Cancer” and the workshop I’m involved in focuses on how we can use already existing data for better diagnoses and treatment of cancer.

The main organizer of our workshop is Åsa Cajander and Christiane Grünloh and I are the co-organizers. I think we have a very good plan for the workshop and later on this week we are submitting our contribution to the so called pre-conference report which will be published later on during the spring. The workshop is based on the critical incident and vision seminar techniques and the format will be tested in a workshop at Medical Informatics Europe in April, as I explained here. I will write more about the content of our workshop around the time when the pre-conference report is published.

The summit does not only contain workshops but also several plenum sessions. The content of these sessions, as well as the content of all workshops, is discussed in meetings about once a month. One representative from each workshop takes part in these monthly meetings. The planning around the summit is very well organized and I’m sure we will end up with a great program during this year’s summit at Uppsala Castle, June 14-15!

DOME · eHealth · Medical Records Online · National patient survey

Got three papers and one workshop accepted to Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) 2018!

MIE_accept

Last week it was confirmed that three papers, where I’m one of the co-authors, were accepted to the Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) 2018 conference in Gothenburg! On top of this DOME researchers also got a workshop accepted to the same conference.

One of the papers was accepted as a “short communication”. This was a submission about a few results from the national patient survey (about the patient accessible electronic health record system Journalen), related to psychiatry patients and their perception of Journalen. The title of the paper is “Vulnerable, but not neglected? – Patient accessible psychiatry records” and it’s written by Gunilla Myreteg and me.

Another paper (which was accepted as a full paper) was related to waiting times before the patient can access new information in Journalen. Even in this paper we used a few results from the national patient survey. The title of that paper is “Timing it right – patients’ online access to their record notes in Sweden” and it’s written by Maria Hägglund, me, Rose-Mharie Åhlfeldt and Isabella Scandurra.

The last paper (also accepted as a full paper) was actually based on an old master’s thesis project, supervised by Åsa Cajander. This paper also related to Journalen, and more specifically to how nurses’ work environment is affected by the patient being able to access information in Journalen. The title of that paper is “Medical Records Online for Patients and Effects on the Work Environment of Nurses” and it’s written by Åsa, me, Sara Englund and Anastasia Hansman.

In a later blog post I’m going to introduce the workshop at Uppsala Health Summit 2018 that Åsa Cajander, Christiane Grünloh and I are organizing. The MIE workshop, with the title “Identifying the Need of Self-reported Data and Self-measurements for Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer” is actually a narrowed-down version of the Uppsala Health Summit one. I will be the main organizer of this MIE workshop and Åsa, Christiane and Isabella Scandurra are co-organizers.

All in all, this means that the DOME consortium is well represented at MIE and as I have said earlier we will also organize something at Vitalis, which runs in parallel at the same venue. I will surely write more about these papers and the workshop as well as our activities at Vitalis later on during the spring. So, stay tuned! 🙂

conference · DOME · eHealth · Medical Records Online

Calling for papers to a special track on patient accessible electronic health records at CBMS 2018!

DOMEatCBMS

This year, I am organizing a special track at the Computer-Based Medical Systems (CBMS) annual conference, together with four colleagues from the DOME consortium:

This is our special track introduction:

In an effort to help patients to become more informed, cope with their diagnosis, understand their disease process and increase their participation in healthcare decision making, there is an international movement towards providing patients with Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records (PAEHRs). Through these systems patients can often access medical notes, lab results, and track referrals. Probably two of the most widely known examples of PAEHR systems are OpenNotes in USA and myUHN Patient Portal in Canada. Other countries that use PAEHRs as components of their health delivery systems are Estonia, United Kingdom and several Nordic countries. The implementation of PAEHRs has apparent implications to both patients and healthcare professionals. When the Swedish PAEHR system Journalen was implemented in Uppsala County Council in 2012, healthcare professionals expressed strong concerns regarding e.g. that patients would begin to contact healthcare providers by telephone to ask about words and phrases they do not understand, or that patients would become anxious on learning about serious diagnoses when reading record notes. Physicians saw the medical records as their work tool and not a system for communication with patients. Similar opinions have been raised by healthcare professionals in other countries where similar systems have been implemented. There is relatively few studies on PAEHRs from the patient’s perspective, but the findings so far indicate positive attitudes towards the perceived usefulness of PAEHRs.

The organisers of this special track are all members of the Swedish national DOME (Development of Online Medical records and E-health services) consortium – a consortium focusing on research on PAEHRs from a multi-disciplinary perspective (human-computer interaction, health informatics, security and privacy, health information behaviour, to name a few). This special track aims at bringing researchers as well as patients together to discuss the latest research concerning the implementation and development of PAEHRs as well as research concerning experiences with and attitudes towards PAEHRs from the patient and professional perspectives. Since implementations often differ between countries and sometimes even within one country (e.g. as in Sweden), contributions comparing implementation of PAEHRs in different countries and contexts are especially welcome. Patient-focused researchers are encouraged to contribute with research papers highlighting patient perspective, including research on PAEHRs with a functionality that allows patients to add information to their medical records online. Reports of new initiatives related to PAEHRs are also of special interest.

See the 4th track on this page for more information about topics of interest and see the call for papers here. If you do (or have done) research related to patient accessible electronic health records you are more than welcome to submit a paper to our special track! Please note that the deadline for abstracts is 5/2 and the deadline for full papers is 19/2.

eHealth · Grant application · Multimodality

Looking forward to a spring of opportunities!

Spring_2018

This will be a very special year for me, since my postdoc period at Uppsala University will end in September and I currently have no idea what will happen after that. I may be able to find a way to continue my work in Uppsala, but that is far from given. But, as the heading of this post suggests (as well as my picture), there are a bunch of possibilities up ahead. I now have several project ideas and the same goes for my current colleagues at Uppsala University and my former colleagues at KTH. On top of this, there are two interesting assistant professorship and three associate professorship jobs to apply for!

When it comes to open positions, all I have found are in the area of healthcare/eHealth (two of these, from Uppsala University, are technically about information systems in general, but can easily be angled towards health systems). One of the open positions belong to KTH, two to Uppsala University and two to Örebro University. I will write more about these when I have applied for the respective positions. The downside here is that I will probably not be able to work with multimodal interaction if given one of these positions, but on the other hand eHealth is an area that I am really interested in.

Even though it would be great to get a semi-secure assistant professorship, getting research projects would be even more interesting since these often run for four years (same duration as a regular assistant professorship). Research projects which you define yourself, in collaboration with colleagues, are probably also even more in line with your main interests. The current plan is that I will be the main applicant on one project application to Forte (Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare) and co-applicant in one project application to the VR (Swedish Research Council), one project application to Vinnova (the challenge driven innovation call) and two project applications to AFA Försäkringar (AFA Insurance). On top of that I will also be co-applicant on a research program application to Riksbankens Jubileumsfond and one grant application for Interdisciplinary Research Environments to VR. Four of the applications concern collaboration in multimodal environments and three concern eHealth systems. The ideal result here would be to get one project/program in each research area, since that would make it possible for me to continue working with my two favorite topics. One can always hope…

If given the choice I would pick the research program and the interdisciplinary research environment. By the way, fantastic things happen in the world of research applications from time to time – during autumn 2016 the researcher in charge of our HTO group at Uppsala University, Åsa Cajander, got three project grants during one week! One side effect was that our research group moved to a larger office area to make room for new collaborators. If we get that lucky this time around I guess they might have to build a new house for us… 😉

Social media in higher education · Thesis defense

My colleague, Pernilla Josefsson, successfully defended her thesis today!

Pernilla

Today I spent the entire afternoon at KTH, attending Pernilla Josefsson’s thesis defense and afterwards joining a dinner. Pernilla has focused on the use of social media in higher education, and more specifically students’ use. The thesis, “Higher education meets private use of social media technologies – an explorative study of student’s use” can be found here. As always, it is interesting to attend colleagues’ defenses, but this one was quite special for me since some of the work Pernilla and I have been collaborating on, related to the use of Twitter in higher education courses, was included in the thesis and discussed during the defense session. The main supervisor was professor Stefan Hrastinski from the School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (KTH) and the co-supervisors were associate professors Olle Bälter and Daniel Pargman from the School of Computer Science and Communication (KTH). The opponent was professor Grainne Conole from University of Leicester.

After a rather short introduction by the opponent, the discussion between Grainne and Pernilla took place. This discussion was really interesting to follow and touched on many different aspects such as the connection between roles and activities on social networks (in this case Wikipedia, Facebook and Twitter), the reason for selecting this particular research topic and of course the choice of platforms. One thing that the opponent highlighted was that she could really “feel” Pernilla’s passion for the work when reading the thesis and this was also something that the grading committee brought up. This says a lot about the quality of the work performed and about Pernilla as a researcher. I also particularly liked the discussion about the reasons for choosing this particular research topic – the reasons were grounded in her practice as a teacher and discussions with students as well as teachers.

When it came to answering questions, Pernilla did a very good job during the entire session. She really gave clear and well thought through answers and was calm during the entire session. She was not afraid to take pauses and think things through before responding. At one point the opponent asked a rather tricky question about how the concept of affordances was used (difficult to answer without a clear context). Before answering Pernilla defined an example context, which is of course a very good way of handling the situation. The grading committee also complimented the very “thought through and structured answers”.

When it comes to the study Pernilla and I collaborated on I will write more on this blog when it is published. That will probably happen during this spring. The study on Twitter is not the only thing we have been collaborating on. This week we are e.g. submitting a chapter to a book about the use of social media in educational settings and we also have the ongoing study about the use of teacher administrated Facebook groups introduced here.

communication · design · DOME · eHealth · EIT · EIT Health · Grant application · Human-Computer Interaction · Medical Records Online · National patient survey · Social media in higher education

Looking back at 2017!

Färjeläget

A new year has just begun and before I start blogging about current activities, I will take this opportunity to look back at some of the important things that happened last year. If you have been following this blog regularly, you have probably already read about the last summer’s adventures at the ACM SIGCHI/EIT Health summer school in a number of different posts so I will not get into any detail about that school here. If you want to read about what went on during this eHealth/mHealth design summer school you should read this post and all the posts it links to. The same goes for the very successful DOME session about patient accessible electronic health records at Vitalis, which I describe here.  As in all other of my meta-posts, I have chosen one of the nature pictures I took myself during the year.

Selected research activities

There was quite a lot of research going on last year. The research activities related to all of my focus areas eHealth, multimodal communication and social media in higher education courses. Naturally, most of my activities were connected to eHealth. Primarily, I continued working with the national patient survey on patient accessible electronic health records in Sweden (introduced here) and the interview/observation/survey study with physicians and nurses (introduced here). Last year’s work with the national patient survey resulted in four submitted manuscripts (to one journal and two conferences) and there is a lot more we can do with that study! It became especially interesting when we started comparing responses from different disease groups during the end of 2017. I will tell you more about these results later on when we have some publications. In the other study we conducted several interviews with physicians, about the effects of patients accessible electronic health records on their work environment, during the autumn. Most of the surveys have also been handed in. I will not discuss the results before they get published but I can tell you that both the qualitative and quantitative data gathered this far show that this study was very much needed! During the autumn I also started to, with my DOME consortium colleague Gunilla Myreteg, follow the implementation of psychiatry records online in Region Uppsala. I will write more about that in later posts.

I also started on another track related to eHealth – how we can make use of data from different sources for better diagnoses and treatment of cancer. This topic is also connected to big data and happens to be one of the themes covered in the 2018 version of Uppsala Health Summit. I am one of the organizers behind a workshop there and I also submitted a workshop proposal to a conference on the same theme. It remains to be seen if this will become one of my main research focuses in the future. It’s definitely and interesting and very important topic.

My work on multimodal mediated communication during 2017 focused primarily on revising a journal manuscript (presenting a study I was a part of during my last year at KTH) and submitting two posters to the Swedish Cognitive Science Society conference which was held in Uppsala in October. The accepted submissions are more thoroughly presented here and here.

Teaching

During autumn I was, together with Mohammad Obaid, responsible for a master level introductory course in Human-Computer Interaction. I really enjoyed that and I think the changes made to the course before it started really made a positive difference. One of the new parts we introduced to the course was a very appreciated creative prototyping session which I describe here. The students presented their final results in the middle of December and those results were very good. I describe the final presentation sessions here and the four finalists (which will compete for the winning team award) in these four blog posts:

  1. HCI course finalist 1: enhancing and simplifying the biking experience through augmented reality!
  2. HCI course finalist 2: utilizing haptic feedback for alerts and navigation cues!
  3. HCI course finalist 3: a solution for finding bikes to rent at your destination!
  4. HCI course finalist 4: a device presenting real-time and easily read navigational cues!

My research on the use of social media in higher education courses was also combined with my teaching in this course. The focus of that research is a teacher administrated Facebook-group which has been used as a complementary communication channel during the course. I explain the basic idea here.

Some other activities

Other activities worth bringing up here are my participation in the EIT Health Alumni Connect and the INNOVEIT events in Budapest in October. It was a great experience being there and my blog posts about Connect and INNOVEIT as well as those about the summer school also resulted in me being asked if I wanted to work with the EIT Health Alumni communication manager! Of course I accepted, but it remains to be seen exactly how that work should be carried out and what the tasks will be.

In November, I also took part in the first meeting as a representative in the eHealth council at the National Board of Health and Welfare in Sweden. I wrote about some of my experiences from that meeting here. I think many interesting collaborations can be found here!

In April I also submitted my first ever VR (the Swedish Research Council) application, which focused on support for collaboration between sighted and deafblind pupils in school. I wrote about that here. Unfortunately, we did not get a grant this time, but we got a “Very good” ranking on all criteria related to the content and feasibility so we will definitely move on with our ideas!