DOME · eHealth · Medical Records Online · National patient survey

Got three papers and one workshop accepted to Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) 2018!

MIE_accept

Last week it was confirmed that three papers, where I’m one of the co-authors, were accepted to the Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) 2018 conference in Gothenburg! On top of this DOME researchers also got a workshop accepted to the same conference.

One of the papers was accepted as a “short communication”. This was a submission about a few results from the national patient survey (about the patient accessible electronic health record system Journalen), related to psychiatry patients and their perception of Journalen. The title of the paper is “Vulnerable, but not neglected? – Patient accessible psychiatry records” and it’s written by Gunilla Myreteg and me.

Another paper (which was accepted as a full paper) was related to waiting times before the patient can access new information in Journalen. Even in this paper we used a few results from the national patient survey. The title of that paper is “Timing it right – patients’ online access to their record notes in Sweden” and it’s written by Maria Hägglund, me, Rose-Mharie Åhlfeldt and Isabella Scandurra.

The last paper (also accepted as a full paper) was actually based on an old master’s thesis project, supervised by Åsa Cajander. This paper also related to Journalen, and more specifically to how nurses’ work environment is affected by the patient being able to access information in Journalen. The title of that paper is “Medical Records Online for Patients and Effects on the Work Environment of Nurses” and it’s written by Åsa, me, Sara Englund and Anastasia Hansman.

In a later blog post I’m going to introduce the workshop at Uppsala Health Summit 2018 that Åsa Cajander, Christiane Grünloh and I are organizing. The MIE workshop, with the title “Identifying the Need of Self-reported Data and Self-measurements for Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer” is actually a narrowed-down version of the Uppsala Health Summit one. I will be the main organizer of this MIE workshop and Åsa, Christiane and Isabella Scandurra are co-organizers.

All in all, this means that the DOME consortium is well represented at MIE and as I have said earlier we will also organize something at Vitalis, which runs in parallel at the same venue. I will surely write more about these papers and the workshop as well as our activities at Vitalis later on during the spring. So, stay tuned! 🙂

communication · design · DOME · eHealth · EIT · EIT Health · Grant application · Human-Computer Interaction · Medical Records Online · National patient survey · Social media in higher education

Looking back at 2017!

Färjeläget

A new year has just begun and before I start blogging about current activities, I will take this opportunity to look back at some of the important things that happened last year. If you have been following this blog regularly, you have probably already read about the last summer’s adventures at the ACM SIGCHI/EIT Health summer school in a number of different posts so I will not get into any detail about that school here. If you want to read about what went on during this eHealth/mHealth design summer school you should read this post and all the posts it links to. The same goes for the very successful DOME session about patient accessible electronic health records at Vitalis, which I describe here.  As in all other of my meta-posts, I have chosen one of the nature pictures I took myself during the year.

Selected research activities

There was quite a lot of research going on last year. The research activities related to all of my focus areas eHealth, multimodal communication and social media in higher education courses. Naturally, most of my activities were connected to eHealth. Primarily, I continued working with the national patient survey on patient accessible electronic health records in Sweden (introduced here) and the interview/observation/survey study with physicians and nurses (introduced here). Last year’s work with the national patient survey resulted in four submitted manuscripts (to one journal and two conferences) and there is a lot more we can do with that study! It became especially interesting when we started comparing responses from different disease groups during the end of 2017. I will tell you more about these results later on when we have some publications. In the other study we conducted several interviews with physicians, about the effects of patients accessible electronic health records on their work environment, during the autumn. Most of the surveys have also been handed in. I will not discuss the results before they get published but I can tell you that both the qualitative and quantitative data gathered this far show that this study was very much needed! During the autumn I also started to, with my DOME consortium colleague Gunilla Myreteg, follow the implementation of psychiatry records online in Region Uppsala. I will write more about that in later posts.

I also started on another track related to eHealth – how we can make use of data from different sources for better diagnoses and treatment of cancer. This topic is also connected to big data and happens to be one of the themes covered in the 2018 version of Uppsala Health Summit. I am one of the organizers behind a workshop there and I also submitted a workshop proposal to a conference on the same theme. It remains to be seen if this will become one of my main research focuses in the future. It’s definitely and interesting and very important topic.

My work on multimodal mediated communication during 2017 focused primarily on revising a journal manuscript (presenting a study I was a part of during my last year at KTH) and submitting two posters to the Swedish Cognitive Science Society conference which was held in Uppsala in October. The accepted submissions are more thoroughly presented here and here.

Teaching

During autumn I was, together with Mohammad Obaid, responsible for a master level introductory course in Human-Computer Interaction. I really enjoyed that and I think the changes made to the course before it started really made a positive difference. One of the new parts we introduced to the course was a very appreciated creative prototyping session which I describe here. The students presented their final results in the middle of December and those results were very good. I describe the final presentation sessions here and the four finalists (which will compete for the winning team award) in these four blog posts:

  1. HCI course finalist 1: enhancing and simplifying the biking experience through augmented reality!
  2. HCI course finalist 2: utilizing haptic feedback for alerts and navigation cues!
  3. HCI course finalist 3: a solution for finding bikes to rent at your destination!
  4. HCI course finalist 4: a device presenting real-time and easily read navigational cues!

My research on the use of social media in higher education courses was also combined with my teaching in this course. The focus of that research is a teacher administrated Facebook-group which has been used as a complementary communication channel during the course. I explain the basic idea here.

Some other activities

Other activities worth bringing up here are my participation in the EIT Health Alumni Connect and the INNOVEIT events in Budapest in October. It was a great experience being there and my blog posts about Connect and INNOVEIT as well as those about the summer school also resulted in me being asked if I wanted to work with the EIT Health Alumni communication manager! Of course I accepted, but it remains to be seen exactly how that work should be carried out and what the tasks will be.

In November, I also took part in the first meeting as a representative in the eHealth council at the National Board of Health and Welfare in Sweden. I wrote about some of my experiences from that meeting here. I think many interesting collaborations can be found here!

In April I also submitted my first ever VR (the Swedish Research Council) application, which focused on support for collaboration between sighted and deafblind pupils in school. I wrote about that here. Unfortunately, we did not get a grant this time, but we got a “Very good” ranking on all criteria related to the content and feasibility so we will definitely move on with our ideas!

conference · DOME · eHealth · Medical Records Online · National patient survey · Vitalis

Co-authored three submissions to Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) 2018!

MIE_submit

Since the conference Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) is held at the same time and place as Vitalis this year several of the researchers within the DOME consortium as well as in our HTO group at Uppsala University, have submitted quite a few papers to MIE and seminar proposals to Vitalis. In an earlier blog post I wrote about the two proposals I wrote to Vitalis, which both focused on different aspects of patients accessible electronic health records.

Aside from writing proposals to Vitalis, I also co-authored three MIE papers together with several DOME colleagues. One of those papers focuses on how patient access to medical records online is affecting the work environment for nurses and I wrote it together with Åsa Cajander. It’s actually based on an earlier master’s thesis which Åsa supervised. This paper was done quite a while ago.

The two other papers were based partly on results from the national patient survey study which I am currently leading (we have been at the analyses/reporting stage for quite a while). One of those papers focuses on delay periods (before patients can access information in their electronic health record) for signed and unsigned notes and how these differ between county councils. Maria Hägglund was the main author and Rose-Mharie Åhlfeldt and Isabella Scandurra were the other co-authors.

The second paper which was based on the patient survey focuses on psychiatry records online – an area which we will focus on much more in the near future. I will explain why in a later blog post about upcoming activities. I wrote this paper together with Gunilla Myreteg, who was the main author.

Here you can find an introduction of all researchers working with the national patients survey. I should not give any more details right now about specific analysis results or focus themes in the national survey study since that could interfere with later blind review processes. But I can tell you that the results covered in the very short MIE submissions (five pages is the limit!) are just small parts of the material we have regarding a few of the focus areas we are covering in that study. We are just getting started!  🙂

The deadline for MIE-submissions was last Sunday, November 12. January 20 the authors will get the verdicts (accept/reject). I can hardly wait!

 

DOME · eHealth · Haptics · Medical applications · Medical Records Online · National patient survey · Summer school

Today I celebrate my blog’s first anniversary!

Ren1

Exactly one year ago I wrote my very first blog post! You can read that short post here. From the beginning my intention was to write two posts a week, but for different reasons my average during this first year is 1.4/week. During this first year the blog has had 2782 views by 1466 visitors. During the first couple of months the number of views were under 100, but I’m glad to see that the numbers have kept increasing – the number of views in September was 491, and 53 views have been accumulated during the first days of October this year.

Since this is a special blog post, the picture I chose is not by any means related to my work. Instead, I chose one of the pictures I took while hiking in northern Sweden (Abisko) about two years ago – I just love the nature up there!

As a kind of celebration, I will here present a top 5 list with the five most read posts:

  1. My colleague, Thomas Lind, successfully defended his thesis today!

This is one of my latest posts, which I uploaded in the middle of September. Despite the short time frame this is, by far, the most read post! The post is about the defense resulting in my colleague, Thomas Lind, getting a Ph.D. degree.

  1. EHealth summer school in Dublin, day 5

Those who have followed my blog during the latest months know that I have been writing quite extensively about a summer school I attended – one week in Dublin and one week in Stockholm. I’m very happy to see that one of those posts is on this list, because it took quite a lot of time to write them. This particular post is also a kind of summary post which includes links to the other posts about the week in Dublin. The summer school was a nice experience in so many ways and I really encourage you to read those posts if you are interested in eHealth/mHealth design (the Stockholm posts, although not on the top 5 lists, can be found here).

  1. A very successful session about patient accessible electronic health records at Vitalis 2017!

This post is not only on the top 5 list regarding views, but it is, by far, the most shared post on social media. The post summarizes an 1.5 hours session hosted by the DOME consortium at Vitalis last spring. I really hope we will get the opportunity to do something similar at Vitalis 2018! Read this post if you want to know about the state of art regarding patient accessible electronic health records in Sweden.

  1. The team behind a new large patient survey on electronic health records in Sweden!

I’m also happy to see this one on the list – since this post represents one of the big studies I’m currently leading. This particular study is based on a large national survey focusing on patients’ experiences with and attitudes towards the patient accessible electronic health system Journalen. In this post I introduce all researchers that work with the study.

  1. Haptic feedback in medical applications

The fifth most read post belongs to the blog series on haptic feedback as an interaction modality, which I started last autumn. This particular one concerns how haptic feedback can be utilized in medical applications. In this post I also introduce my own work within this area, which I carried out as a Ph.D. student at KTH.

So, these were my five most read posts, and I’m glad to see that they relate to different areas. The only area not covered in this list is pedagogical development. This might change during the next year, however, since I will most probably get an extensive study on Twitter as a communication medium in higher education courses published and I will also write a series of posts about a basic course in human-computer interaction which I will be responsible for at Uppsala University (starting October 30).

I have really enjoyed the blogging activity and will definitely continue to update this blog regularly, so stay tuned for more!  🙂

DISA · DOME · Medical Records Online · National patient survey

Workshop day with DOME researchers

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This week, Christiane Grünloh (Ph.D. student from KTH and one of the researchers within the DOME consortium) is visiting Uppsala University to work mostly with the oncology interview study but also the national patient survey. Today, Gunilla Myreteg and Maria Hägglund, also from DOME, joined us. In the picture above we are looking at and discussing the current interview template (from left to right: me, Christiane, Gunilla and Maria). It was very nice to work together in this small group – normally we are spread out and communicate only via Skype.

Christiane, Maria and I started out by going through the interview questions once again, since we have not yet conducted any of the interviews with physicians at the oncology department. We did some updates and piloted the interview with Gunilla when she arrived. We are not sure, but hopefully we can do the first interview(s) tomorrow.

During the last hour we also discussed what was needed to be able to finalize an overview article about the national patient survey. It should not take long before we have a manuscript ready!

We ended the day with a nice dinner at an Italian restaurant in Uppsala, where more persons, mostly from the HTO group at Uppsala University, also joined. Even though we did not spend the entire day writing on the overview article for the national patient survey as we planned from the beginning, we still had a very productive day. Hope we will all meet again soon!

 

DOME · eHealth · Medical Records Online · National patient survey · Vitalis

A very successful session about patient accessible electronic health records at Vitalis 2017!

Samlingsbild

I recently got back home to Stockholm again, after three great days at the 2017 version of Vitalis (Senska mässan) in Gothenburg. As I wrote in this blog post, several researchers from the DOME consortium and representatives from Inera and SALAR (Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions) were presenting during a 1.5 hours session May 26. We are all very pleased with the outcome and I will try to summaize the main points below (all presentations were in Swedish).

Introduction of the speakers and DOME

DOMEpresentation

The whole session was introduced by Isabella Scandurra, who gave a quick overview. As a part of this introduction every one of the 10 ten persons who should talk during the session, came up on stage and presented themselves shortly. After the introduction, Åsa Cajander presented the history behind the DOME consortium and Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records (PAEHR) in Sweden. The image above show the current partners; Uppsala University, University of Skövde, Örebro University, Karlstad University, Royal Institute of Technology and Karolinska Institutet.

Role play!!

Role_play

After the introduction a role play was carried out between Isabella and Åsa (see picture above). Isabella played the physician (with the 1177.se scarf!) and Åsa the patient and the idea was to present an ideal scenario where Journalen (a PAEHR system in Sweden) was used as a focus in the communication during a patient visit. Unfortunately, Journalen is not used in that way today – it’s seldom mentioned during visits and some example comments from physicians, from earlier interview studies, showed that they were not enthusiastic. Nevertheless, this was a very good way of illustrating the intended use of Journalen, and comments from the audience show that this part of our session was very appreciated.

The national patient survey

Enkät2

Hanife Rexhepi and I were next in line! We presented a collection of results from the large national patient survey. Hanife started by introducing the rationale behind the survey and its basic building blocks, after which I described some demographic results (e.g. that most respondents were from Uppsala and Skåne, that most of them were highly educated and that women were in majority). I also discussed general attitudes, which are very positive as shown in the image above, importance of different information types and common reasons for using Journalen. Hanife then ended with some more results, e.g. stating that the respondents understand most of the contents in Journalen, and a summary.

Journalen for children

Barn

After Hanife’s and my performance it was time for Maria Pettersson from Inera and Martin Price from SALAR to get up on stage and talk about Journalen for children. As it is today, parents can access their child’s PAEHR until the child turns 13 and the child itself then gets automatic access to Journalen from the day he/she turns 16. There is currently a gap, 13-16, where no one gets automatic access. It is, however, possible for the child and/or a parent to apply for direct access. Maria’s introduction (illustrated in the image above) brought this up, as well as how security in that age group can be tackled. Martin then continued with results from studies performed with parents and children, highlighting key aspects regarding e.g. usage, risks, access by parents vs. children and understandability. Quite a few audio recordings with interesting quotes were played during this presentation.

Journalen is the key – for the one who is sick

Jenny

The last presentation was held by Jenny Juremalm from Inera and focused on comments from patients who use Journalen (when logged in to Journalen, there is a possibility to contact Inera and comment on Journalen and how it is being used). In the picture above, there is a summary about why patients want to use Journalen. Most of the points coincide with results from the national patient survey. Access to test results was very high up on the list. It is good that “being in control” and “better communication with care” are also at the top on the list. The facts that all county councils have not yet introduced Journalen (at the end of 2017 everyone should have joined, though) and that different information is shown in different county councils were also brought up to discussion. Increasing the use and taking care in listening to experiences from patients and medical professionals were among the points we need to focus on for the future.

Sneak peek panel and mentometer

Mentometer

The last part consisted of a “sneak peek panel” lead by Rose-Mharie Åhlfeldt, where two of our Ph.D. students from the HTO group at Uppsala University, Ida Löscher and Diane Golay, presented the newly started DISA (The effects of digitalization on the work environment of nurses) project. Åsa presented some preliminary results from the Interact submission about interviews with nurses that I mentioned here and Isabella presented the newly started PACESS (patient-centred assessment of patients’ online access to electronic health records) project.

At the very end, the audience was given the possibility to submit questions to the panel through a mentometer solution. Most of those questions were directed to Maria and Jenny from Inera. In fact, the audience was invited to interact through mentometer after each presentation – a few questions, relevant to the respective presentations, were presented and everyone could see a live presentation of the results as they were pouring in! The mentometer activities were also lead by Rose-Mharie. In the image above the question “How many years will it take until Journalen is used for communication between care professionals and patients?”, and we can see that 5 years won in this case. Isabella, Åsa and Rose-Mharie, shown in the image, are also the three researchers forming the managing team of the DOME consortium.

Short sum up

We were all pleased with our session and the audience also gave very positive comments on several of the presentations! So, I guess it is safe to label our session a success. It was very fun to be a part of this and I especially liked the varying presentation modes (text, diagrams, audio recordings, role play…) and the mentometer interaction with the audience. In fact, we got quite a lot of information from the audience in this way and we may use it for a publication later on! I am very sorry the event is over and I look forward to next year’s version of Vitalis, which will also be held in parallel with the Medical Informatics Europe (MIE) conference in Gothenburg. We will most certainly be back with several submissions to MIE and presentations at Vitalis next year!

DOME · eHealth · Medical Records Online · National patient survey · Vitalis

DOME researchers presenting at Vitalis next week!

DOMEatVitalis

Next week on Wednesday DOME researchers will host a 1.5 hours session about patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHR) in Sweden, just before lunch at Vitalis! Many different topics will be covered such as;

  • The history behind the DOME consortium and PAEHR in Sweden (“Journalen”)
  • Results from studies with medical professionals
  • Results from the national patient survey
  • Medical records online for children
  • Opinions from users of Journalen
  • Preliminary results from ongoing studies

I have discussed our national patient survey in earlier blog posts and during the second DOME presentation slot Hanife Rexhepi and I will present some concrete results from that study! We will, among other things, present basic demographic data, usage behavior and attitudes towards different aspects of Journalen. Later on during the spring there will also be a journal manuscript submitted, but the presentation at Vitalis will be the first occasion where results from the study are presented in public!

Åsa Cajander (coordinator of the DOME consortium) and Isabella Scandurra will present some history and a few results from studies with medical professionals and Rose-Mharie Åhlfeldt will lead the “sneak peak” session where a few new projects within DOME and some preliminary results from ongoing studies are discussed.

Apart from researchers within DOME, a few people from Inera (the company behind Journalen) – Maria Pettersson and Jenny Juremalm – and Martin Price from Uppsala county council will present results on medical records online for children and opinions from users.

I think this will be a great opportunity for us to reach out with our results and also a great opportunity for others to learn about DOME and the status of and attitudes towards patient accessible electronic health records in Sweden. I hope that many will show up and listen to us!