games · Haptics · Multimodality · sonification

Paper on the effect of auditory feedback on gaze behaviour accepted to SMC 2017!

SMC_accept

Earlier this week I wrote about a paper that was accepted to the Frontiers in Education (FIE) 2017 conference, but the fact is that yet another paper which I co-authored was accepted to another conference, Sound and Music Computing (SMC) 2017, earlier in May! Emma Frid (lead author), Roberto Bresin and Eva-Lotta Sallnäs Pysander from the department of Media technology and Interaction Design at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) are the other authors on that paper. The title of the SMC paper is “AN EXPLORATORY STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF AUDITORY FEEDBACK ON GAZE BEHAVIOR IN A VIRTUAL THROWING TASK WITH AND WITHOUT HAPTIC FEEDBACK”.

The paper is based on a small part of an extensive study, focusing on the effect of haptic and audio feedback on perception of object qualities and visual focus, performed a few years ago. In this particular paper we use eye-tracking metrics to investigate if auditory feedback in particular affects gaze behaviour in an environment where the task is to pick up a ball and throw it into a target area. We looked at both the effect of sound in general and effects of different sound models. Like in many other studies we have been involved in, conditions with different modality combinations were compared against each other. I will write more about the results when the paper has been presented and there is a link to the published proceedings. Search for the title given above if you want to find the specific session and listen to Emma’s presentation at the conference!

Here is the abstract, summarizing the main points:

This paper presents findings from an exploratory study on the effect of auditory feedback on gaze behavior. A total of 20 participants took part in an experiment where the task was to throw a virtual ball into a goal in different conditions: visual only, audiovisual, visuohaptic and audiovisuohaptic. Two different sound models were compared in the audio conditions. Analysis of eye tracking metrics indicated large inter-subject variability; difference between subjects was greater than difference between feedback conditions. No significant effect of condition could be observed, but clusters of similar behaviors were identified. Some of the participants’ gaze behaviors appeared to have been affected by the presence of auditory feedback, but the effect of sound model was not consistent across subjects. We discuss individual behaviors and illustrate gaze behavior through sonification of gaze trajectories. Findings from this study raise intriguing questions that motivate future large-scale studies on the effect of auditory feedback on gaze behavior.

As was the case with the FIE paper mentioned earlier, the SMC paper is just presenting a small part of a large study, so there is definitely a lot more to tell about the study and the different parameters measured. I will return to the overall study as soon as more papers are out!  🙂

 

deafblindness · Grant application · Haptics · sonification

Recently submitted my first ever research grant application!

One thing I have not mentioned in this blog before is that I’m one of the researchers behind the newly started network “Nordic Network on ICT and Disability”. This network gathers researchers from universities in Sweden and Denmark, focusing specifically on technology support for people with deafblindness. The reason why I’m a part of the network is primarily that I have developed some multimodal interfaces (based on haptic and audio feedback) for collaboration between sighted and visually impaired pupils in primary school (you can read this article and this conference proceeding for a summary of that work).

I have been thinking about writing a research grant proposal with a group of researchers belonging to the above mentioned network, ever since I joined it. And this year it finally happened! 😀  During a grant club in the middle of March, where several researchers from my division at Uppsala University gathered to write research grant proposals for a day, I ended up with a draft which felt close enough (read more about the very well organized grant club here). The draft was used as basis for discussion in a Skype-meeting with some other members of the network, after which we finally ended up with a research plan everyone felt comfortable with. It was submitted to the Swedish Research Council. I wrote most of the text, but it would never have worked without all the valuable input I got from my colleagues (most of them also co-applicants) both in the form of comments and addition of text chunks.

The proposed research focuses mainly on haptic feedback and how it can be used to support pupils with deafblindness in collaboration with sighted pupils – thus the focus is quite close to the research with visually impaired pupils which I, and several of the other co-applicants, were working on before.

The co-applicants are:

Apart from the above mentioned co-applicants, Charlotte Magnusson ([Research gate]) is also a part of the proposed project as a resource person from CERTEC.

I really believe in this team, since we complement each other in a very good way and we also belong to universities in Sweden which are in the top regarding research on assistive technologies and collaborative haptics. We of course hope the project will be funded, but in case it is not I really hope this team gathers again in search for other possible grants!